Portishead – Third (The ’59) #307

The ’59 2018 #307: 181103

Portishead – Third (2008)

Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, has now turned 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. Currently we’re at year 50 – 2008.

Third was the aptly named third studio album from  Portishead. It was released in the United Kingdom on 28 April 2008 through Island Records, and a day later in the United States through Mercury Records.

Portishead’s first studio album in 11 years, it moved away from the trip hop style they had popularised, incorporating influences including krautrock, surf rock, doo wop, and the film soundtracks of John Carpenter.

The band are named after the nearby town of the same name, eight miles west of Bristol in the UK. Portishead is predominantly Geoff Barrow, Beth Gibbons and Adrian Utley but sometimes includes a fourth member, Dave McDonald, an engineer on their first records.

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Massive Attack – Mezzanine (The ’59) #247

The ’59 2018 #247: 180904

Massive Attack – Mezzanine (1998)

Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, has now turned 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. Currently we’re at year 40 – 1998.

Mezzanine was Massive Attack’s third studio, released on 20 April 1998 by Circa and Virgin Records. It was the first album produced by Neil Davidge.

For legal reasons. the album was first made available as a legal download from the band’s website prior to its hard copy release.

Mezzanine topped the charts in the UK, Australia, Ireland, and New Zealand, becoming the group’s most commercially successful album to date. It spawned four singles: “Risingson”, “Teardrop”, “Angel”, and “Inertia Creeps”

Portishead – Dummy (The ’59) #224

The ‘ 59 2018 #224: 180812

Portishead – Dummy (1994)

Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, has now turned 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. Currently we’re at year 36 – 1994.

Dummy was the debut studio album from Portishead, released on 22 August 1994 by Go! Beat Records.

Portishead take their name from a quiet coastal town on the Severn estuary just north of Bristol in the UK.

The album received critical acclaim and won the 1995 Mercury Music Prize. It is often credited with popularising the trip hop genre, and is frequently cited in lists of the best albums of the 1990s.

Although it achieved only modest chart success overseas, it peaked at number two on the UK Album Chart, and saw two of its three singles reach number 13 on the UK Singles Chart.

Massive Attack – Protection (Epic 2017 #172)

The Epic 2017 Project #172: 170621

Massive Attack – Protection (1994)

So, for mid-summer’s day 2017 we have Massive Attack’s second studio album, released in 1994 and the last to feature Tricky as a member after going solo with his album Maxinquaye in 1995.

Protection was featured in the top ten of Rolling Stone magazine’s ‘Coolest Albums of All Time List’, calling it “great music for when you’re driving around a city at 4 am,” due to the ‘chill out’ nature of the album. Like most of Massive Attack’s albums, the music often defies categorisation, ranging from R&B to hip hop/rap (like Karmacoma) to reggae-tinged synthpop to classical-influenced electronica instrumentals like ‘Weatherstorm’.

The album follows Blue Lines structurally, to the point that the font used on the cover of the album is the same, Helvetica Heavy Italic.Now there’s a useless bit of information to weave into conversation!

Doc le Sac & Scroobius Pip – Thou shalt always kill (Leaping Ahead #165)

Leaping Ahead Project 2016 #165: 160613

[A song for the noughties (6)]

You know, I think I shall just let the lyrics of this exceptional bit of noughties brilliance released in 2008 speak for themselves. This is the clean version but the message is still just as relevant. Get in there and listen.

Run DMC (ft Jason Nevins) – It’s like that (Leaping Ahead #164)

Leaping Ahead Project 2016 #164: 160612

[Favourite 90’s tune (6)]

First released back in 1983 on a cassette backed with the track “Sucker M.C.’s”, it marked the start of Run-D.M.C.’s career and is widely regarded as ushering in a new school of hip hop artists with a street image and an abrasive, minimalist sound that marked them out from their predecessors. Both tracks were collected on the trio’s eponymous debut album in 1984.

But it wasn’t until it was remixed by house DJ Jason Nevins in 1997 that things went international. The ‘original’ remix (perhaps something of an oxymoron) was a bootleg as Mr Nevins (the pickle) didn’t get Run DMC’s permission. But the band and their producer picked it up, sorted out all the contractual rights shenanigans and officially re-released it in 1997. It became a sleeper hit in 1998 and sold around five million copies worldwide, placing it amongst the biggest selling singles of all time. Nevins was only paid some $5,000 for his remix though; perhaps he should have sought permission for doing it in the first place – the silly billy!