Bill Withers – Aint no sunshine (Starters for Ten #160) 10/10 (16)

Starters for Ten 2019 – #160: Top Ten Lurve songs: 190609

Bill Withers – Ain’t no sunshine (1971)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Concluding the 16th – featuring my top ten ‘lurve’ songs – here’s Ain’t no sunshine released by Bill Withers in 1971.

The 2019 ‘Starters for Ten’ series features:
[1] Jan 1-10: Top Ten Blues Rock Stonkers
[2] Jan 10-20: Top Ten Led Zeppelin Tracks
[3] Jan 21-30: Top Ten Spinetinglers
[4] Jan 31-Feb 9: Top Ten Underworld Tracks
[5] Feb 10-19: Top Ten Acoustic Tracks
[6] Feb 20-Mar 1: Top Ten Queen Tracks
[7] Mar 2-11: Top Ten Live Tracks
[8] Mar 12-21: Top Ten Classical pieces
[9] Mar 22-31: Top Ten Soul tracks
[10] April 1-10: Top Ten Classic Rock tracks
[11] April 11-20: Top Ten ‘Ten Years After’ numbers
[12] April 12-30: Top Ten ‘Talking Heads’ tracks
[13] May 1-10: Top Ten Punk Anthems
[14] May 11-20: Top Ten Rock numbers
[15] May 21-30: Top Ten Boogie tracks
[16] May 31-June 9: Top Ten Lurve songs
[17] June 10-19: Top Ten Driving Tracks

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Stevie Wonder – Sir Duke (Starters for Ten #141) 1/10 (15)

Starters for Ten 2019 – #141: Top Ten Boogie tracks: 190521

Stevie Wonder – Sir Duke (1976)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Kickstarting the 15th – featuring my top ten boogie tracks, and running between 21 and 30 May – here’s Sir Duke from Stevie Wonder’s 1976 classic ‘Songs in the key of life.

Isaac Hayes – Walk on by (Starters for Ten #90) 10/10 (9)

Starters for Ten 2019 – 90: Top Ten soul numbers: 190331

Isaac Hayes – Walk on by (1969)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Concluding the 9th – my top ten soul numbers – here’s Walk on By, composed by Burt Bacharach, with lyrics by Hal David for singer Dionne Warwick in 1963, then re-recorded by Isaac Hayes in 1969.

The 2019 ‘Starters for Ten’ series features:
[1] Jan 1-10: Top Ten Blues Rock Stonkers
[2] Jan 10-20: Top Ten Led Zeppelin Tracks
[3] Jan 21-30: Top Ten Spinetinglers
[4] Jan 31-Feb 9: Top Ten Underworld Tracks
[5] Feb 10-19: Top Ten Acoustic Tracks
[6] Feb 20-Mar 1: Top Ten Queen Tracks
[7] Mar 2-11: Top Ten Live Tracks
[8] Mar 12-21: Top Ten Classical pieces
[9] Mar 22-31: Top Ten Soul tracks
[10] April 1-10: Top Ten Classic Rock tracks

Aretha Franklin – Respect (Starters for Ten #89) 9/10 (9)

Starters for Ten 2019 – 89: Top Ten soul numbers: 190330

Aretha Franklin – Respect (1967)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Continuing the 9th – running between 22 and 31 March – and featuring my top ten soul numbers, here’s Respect (written, recorded and released by Otis Redding in 1967) but re-released by Aretha Franklin later that same year. The song subsequently became Aretha’s signature song throughout the rest of her career.

Otis Redding – (Sitting on) the dock of the bay (Starters for Ten #88) 8/10 (9)

Starters for Ten 2019 – 88: Top Ten soul numbers: 190329

Otis Redding – (Sitting on) the dock of the bay (1967)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Continuing the 9th – running between 22 and 31 March – and featuring my top ten soul numbers, here’s (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay,  a song co-written by soul singer Otis Redding and guitarist Steve Cropper. It was recorded by Redding twice in 1967, including once just days before his death in a plane crash. The song was released on Stax Records’ Volt label in 1968, becoming the first posthumous single to top the charts in the US. It reached number 3 on the UK Singles Chart.

Redding started writing the lyrics to the song in August 1967, while sitting on a rented houseboat in Sausalito, California. He completed the song with the help of Cropper, a Stax producer and guitarist for Booker T. & the M.G.’s.

The Staple Singers – I’ll take you there (Starters for Ten #87) 7/10 (9)

Starters for Ten 2019 – 87: Top Ten soul numbers: 190328

The Staple Singers – I’ll take you there (1972)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Continuing the 9th – running between 22 and 31 March – and featuring my top ten soul numbers, here’s I’ll Take You There, a song written by Al Bell, and originally performed by soul/gospel family band The Staple Singers. Released on Stax Records in February 1972, it spent a total of 15 weeks on the charts and reached number-one on the Billboard Hot 100.

Camille Yarbrough – Take Yo Praise (Starters for Ten #86) 6/10 (9)

Starters for Ten 2019 – 86: Top Ten soul numbers: 190327

Camille Yarbrough – Take Yo Praise (1975)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Continuing the 9th – running between 22 and 31 March – and featuring my top ten soul numbers, here’s Take Yo Praise by Camille Yarbrough, originally recorded in 1975 but famously sampled by Fatboy Slim for the 1998 release ‘Praise You’.