The Rolling Stones – Black and Blue (The ’59) #109

The ’59 2018 #109: 180419

The Rolling Stones – Black and Blue (1976)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. Today we’ve reached year 18 – 1976.

Black and Blue was the 13th UK and 15th American studio album from the Rolling Stones, released in 1976.

It was the band’s first studio album with Ronnie Wood as the replacement for Mick Taylor. Wood had played twelve-string acoustic guitar on the track “It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll (But I Like It)” from the It’s Only Rock ‘n Roll album and appears on half of the Black and Blue album tracks (mostly backing vocals) with Wayne Perkins and Harvey Mandel playing guitar on the remaining titles. Keith Richards would later comment “Rehearsing guitar players, that’s what that one was about”.

Though recorded at a transitional moment for the band, the release has received mixed to positive retrospective reviews from publications such as AllMusic, with critic Stephen Thomas Erlewine stating that the album’s “being longer on grooves and jams than songs” ended up being “what’s good about it”.

However, it still produced crackers like ‘Fool to cry’

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The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main Street (The ’59) #084

The ’59 2018 #084: 180325

The Rolling Stones – Exile on Main Street (1972)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 14 – 1972

Exile on Main Street was released on 12 May 1972 on the Rolling Stones Records label. It was the band’s first double album and tenth studio album release. Primarily recorded in a rented villa in Nellcôte, France while the band lived abroad as tax exiles, it’s rooted blues, rock and roll, swing, country, and gospel. The sessions included additional musicians including pianist Nicky Hopkins, saxophonist Bobby Keys, drummer Jimmy Miller, and horn player Jim Price, and were completed at Los Angeles’s Sunset Sound.

A remastered and expanded version of the album was released in Europe on 17 May 2010 and in the United States on 18 May 2010, featuring a bonus disc with 10 new tracks.

The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers (The ’59) #078

The ’59 2018 #078: 180319

The Rolling Stones – Sticky Fingers (1971)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 13 – 1971.

Whilst the artwork for the Rolling Stones’ first album of the decade release in April 1971 was conceived by Andy Warhol, photography was by Billy Name and design was by Craig Braun. Braun and his team had other ideas, such as wrapping the album in rolling paper – a concept later used by Cheech & Chong in Big Bambu – but Jagger was enthused by Warhol’s cover with a zipper. Execution was then handled as Warhol sent Braun Polaroid pictures of a model in tight jeans.

The cover photo of a male model’s crotch clad in tight blue jeans was assumed by many fans to be an image of Mick Jagger, but the people actually involved at the time of the photo shoot claim that Warhol had several different men photographed (Jagger was not among them) and never revealed which shots he used. Among the candidates, Jed Johnson, Warhol’s lover at the time, denied it was his likeness, although his twin brother Jay is a possibility. Those closest to the shoot, and subsequent design, name Factory artist and designer Corey Tippin as the likeliest candidate. Warhol “superstar” Joe Dallesandro claims to have been the model.

After retailers complained that the zipper was causing damage to the vinyl (from stacked shipments of the record), the zipper was “unzipped” slightly to the middle of the record, where damage would be minimised.

Creedence Clearwater Revival – Cosmo’s Factory (The ’59) #076

The ’59 2018 #076: 180317

Creedence Clearwater Revival – Cosmo’s Factory (1970)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 12 – 1970.

With the release of Cosmo’s Factory in July 1970, Creedence Clearwater Revival hit their commercial zenith. It was their fifth album in two years and became an international smash, topping the album charts in six countries.

The band also toured Europe in 1970, playing the Royal Albert Hall to enthusiastic audiences, and had emerged as the most popular band in America by largely ignoring the trippy acid rock indulgences that were typical of the era. However, despite the band’s infectious blend of rockabilly, folk, and R&B, some peers and rock critics dismissed them as a singles band with no substance.

In a 2012 cover story, Uncut observed, “While San Francisco longhairs across the bridge scoffed at their commercialism, Creedence henceforth made a point of releasing double A-sides. And invariably both songs would have an uncanny knack of cutting through to all sections of the population.”

Singer and guitarist Fogerty, who had seemingly arrived out of nowhere, but had actually struggled with his bandmates throughout most of the 1960s as the Blue Velvets and the Golliwogs, composed the group’s songs and generally steered the band artistically, although his grip on the band – including his dubious role as manager – irritated the others, especially his older brother Tom Fogerty, who’d left the band by the end of 1970.

The Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet (The ’59) #061

The ’59 2018 #061: 180302

The Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet (1968)

 

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 10 – 1968.

Beggars Banquet was the seventh British and ninth American studio album from The Rolling Stones. It was released in December 1968 by Decca Records in the United Kingdom and London Records in the United States. The album was a return to roots rock for the band following the psychedelia of their 1967 album Their Satanic Majesties Request. It was the last Rolling Stones album to be released during Brian Jones’ lifetime.

The Rolling Stones – Out of our heads (The ’59) #046

The ’59 2018 #046: 180215

The Rolling Stones – Out of our heads (1965)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 7 – 1965.

Out of Our Heads was the Rolling Stones’ third British album and their fourth in the United States. It was released in 1965 through London Records in the US on 30 July 1965, and Decca Records in the UK on 24 September 1965, with significant track listing differences between the two countries.

The Rolling Stones – No.2 (The ’59) #045

The ’59 2018 #045: 180214

The Rolling Stones – No. 2 (1965)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 7 – 1965.

The Rolling Stones No. 2 was their second UK album, released in 1965 following the massive success of 1964’s debut The Rolling Stones. It followed its predecessor’s tendency to largely feature R&B covers. However, it does contain three compositions from the still-developing Mick Jagger/Keith Richards songwriting team. On Dutch and German pressings of the album, the title is listed as The Rolling Stones Vol. 2 on the front cover, although the back of the album cover still lists the title as The Rolling Stones No. 2.

Using the cover shot for 12 X 5, the second US-released album in October 1964, The Rolling Stones No. 2’s track listing would largely be emulated on the upcoming US release of The Rolling Stones, Now!. While Eric Easton was co-credited as producer alongside Andrew Loog Oldham on The Rolling Stones’ debut album, Oldham takes full production duties for The Rolling Stones No, 2, which was recorded sporadically in the UK and US during 1964.

A huge hit in the UK upon release, The Rolling Stones No. 2 spent 10 weeks at No. 1 in early 1965, becoming one of the year’s biggest sellers in the UK.