MGMT – Oracular Spectacular (The ’59) #299

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MGMT – Oracular Spectacular (2007)

Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, has now turned 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. Currently we’re at year 49 – 2007.

Oracular Spectacular was the debut album from MGMT, released digitally on October 2, 2007 by RED Ink and physically on January 22, 2008 by Columbia.

Promotion for the album started in June 2007, when the song “Weekend Wars” was given away in summer issues of free monthly magazine Nöjesguiden in Stockholm, Sweden. Matching CDs could be picked up for free in all stores in three different shopping malls around Stockholm from June 26 to July 31.

The album was also promoted with three singles: “Time to Pretend”, “Electric Feel” and “Kids”.

It was nominated for the International Album award at the 2009 Brit Awards and in 2012, Rolling Stone ranked it at number 494 on its updated list of The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

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Lewis Taylor II (The ’59) #261

The ’59 2018 #261: 180918

Lewis Taylor II (2000)

Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, has now turned 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. Currently we’re at year 42 – 2000.

Andrew Lewis Taylor was born and raised in Barnet, North London in the late 1960s. He started in the music business as a guitarist touring with the Edgar Broughton Band. Then, In 1986 he began performing as Sheriff Jack, releasing two albums – ‘Laugh Yourself Awake’ (1986) and ‘What Lovely Melodies!’ (1987).

As Lewis Taylor, he released his self-titled album in 1996, through Island Records, and ‘Lewis II‘ four years later in June 2000.

Super Furry Animals – Fuzzy Logic (The ’59) #233

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Super Furry Animals – Fuzzy Logic (1996)

Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, has now turned 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. Currently we’re at year 38 – 1996.

Fuzzy Logic was the debut album from Welsh rockers,  Super Furry Animals. It was recorded at Rockfield Studios in Wales, and released on the Creation label in May 1996.

it was positively received by critics, who felt it was an eclectic if inconsistent mix of psychedelic music and glam rock, and was included in Q Magazine’s list of recordings of the year. It reached No.23 in the UK album charts

It’s retained that respect as it was listed in Q’s “Best British Albums Ever” in July 2004, and was included in the book 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.

Four singles were released from the album, two of them – “If You Don’t Want Me to Destroy You” and “Something 4 the Weekend” – being top 20 hits. The other two charters were  “God! Show Me Magic” and “Hometown Unicorn”.

Pink Floyd – Piper at the gates of dawn (The ’59) #059

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Pink Floyd – Piper at the gates of dawn (1967)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 9 – 1967.

Piper at the Gates of Dawn was the debut studio album from Pink Floyd, and the only one made under founding member Syd Barrett’s leadership. The album, named after the title of chapter seven of Kenneth Grahame’s ‘The Wind in the Willows’ and featuring a cover photo of the band taken by Vic Singh, was recorded from February to May 1967 and released on 5 August 1967.

Since its release, the album has been hailed as one of the best psychedelic rock albums. In 1973, it was packaged with the band’s second album, A Saucerful of Secrets, and released as ‘A Nice Pair’ to introduce new fans to the band’s early work after the success of ‘The Dark Side of the Moon’. Special limited editions of the album were issued to mark its thirtieth and fortieth anniversaries in 1997 and 2007, respectively, with the latter release containing bonus tracks.

In 2012, The Piper at the Gates of Dawn was voted 347th on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time”.

The Rolling Stones – Their Satanic Majesties request (The ’59) #056

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The Rolling Stones – Their Satanic Majesties Request (1967)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 9 – 1967.

Their Satanic Majesties Request is the sixth British and eighth American studio album by the Rolling Stones, released in December 1967 by Decca Records in the UK and London Records in the United States.

Recording sessions saw the band experimenting widely with a psychedelic sound in the studio, incorporating elements such as unconventional instruments, sound effects, string arrangements, and African rhythms. The album’s title is a play on the “Her Britannic Majesty requests and requires …” text that appears inside a British passport. It is the first Stones album to feature the same track listings in both its UK and US versions.

On its release the album was criticised as being derivative of the contemporaneous work of the Beatles, particularly their June 1967 release Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band, with the similarities extending to the LP’s lenticular cover. In subsequent decades, however, it has gradually risen in critical reputation.

The Rolling Stones – Between the Buttons (The ’59) #055

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The Rolling Stones – Between the Buttons (1967)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 9 – 1967.

Between the Buttons is the fifth British and seventh American studio album by The Rolling Stones, released on 20 January 1967 in the UK and 21 January in the US as the follow-up to Aftermath. It was the beginning of the Stones’ brief foray into psychedelia.

In 2012, the American version of Between the Buttons, which included “Let’s Spend the Night Together” and “Ruby Tuesday”, was ranked No.357 on Rolling Stone magazine’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s lonely hearts club band (The ’59) #054

The ’59 2018 #054: 180223

The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper’s lonely hearts club band (1967)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 9 – 1967.

Released on 26 May 1967 in the UK and 2 June 1967 in the United States, Sgt Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band was an immediate commercial and critical success, spending 27 weeks at the top of the UK albums chart and 15 weeks at number one in the US. On release, the album was lauded by the vast majority of critics for its innovations in music production, songwriting and graphic design, for bridging a cultural divide between popular music and high art, and for providing a musical representation of its generation and the contemporary counterculture. It won four Grammy Awards in 1968, including Album of the Year, the first rock LP to receive this honour.

In February 1967, after recording the title track “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band”, McCartney suggested that the Beatles should release an entire album that would represent a performance by the fictional Sgt. Pepper band. This alter ego group would give them the freedom to experiment musically. During the recording sessions, the band furthered the technological progression they had made with their 1966 album Revolver. Knowing they would not have to perform the tracks live, they adopted an experimental approach to composition and recording on songs such as “With a Little Help from My Friends”, “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” and “A Day in the Life”. Producer George Martin and engineer Geoff Emerick’s innovative recording of the album included the liberal application of sound shaping signal processing and the use of a 40-piece orchestra performing aleatoric crescendos. Recording was completed on 21 April 1967.

The cover, depicting the Beatles posing in front of a tableau of celebrities and historical figures, was designed by the British pop artists Peter Blake and Jann Haworth. (And yes, I can tell you who each of them is from the numbered outline above, if you care to ask).