The Beatles – Help (The ’59) #043

The ’59 2018 #043: 180212

The Beatles – Help (1965)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 7 – 1965.

Help! was the fifth studio album from the Beatles and the soundtrack from their film of the same name. Produced by George Martin and released on 6 August 1965, seven of its fourteen songs, including the singles “Help!” and “Ticket to Ride”, appeared in the film and took up the first side of the album. The second side contained seven other releases including the most-covered song ever written, “Yesterday”.

The American release was a true soundtrack album, mixing the first seven songs with instrumental material from the film. Of the other seven songs that were on the British release, two were released on the US version of the next Beatles album, Rubber Soul, two were back-to-back on the next US single and then appeared on Yesterday and Today, and three had already been on Beatles VI.

In 2012, Help! was voted 331st on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time” and in September 2013, after the British Phonographic Industry changed their sales award rules, it was declared as having gone platinum.

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The Beatles – Beatles for sale (The ’59) #038

The ’59 2018 #038: 180207

The Beatles – Beatles for sale (1964)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 6 – 1964.

The Beatles’ 4th studio album was released on 4 December 1964 in the UK on EMI’s Parlophone label. Eight of the album’s fourteen tracks appeared on Capitol Records’ concurrent release, Beatles ’65, issued in North America only. The album marked a departure from the ebullient tone that had characterised the Beatles’ previous work, partly due to the band’s exhaustion after a series of tours that had established them as a worldwide phenomenon in 1964. The songs introduced darker musical moods and more introspective lyrics, with John Lennon adopting an autobiographical perspective in compositions such as “I’m a Loser” and “No Reply”. The album also reflected the twin influences of country music and Bob Dylan, whom the Beatles met in New York in August 1964.

The Beatles recorded the album at EMI Studios in London in between their touring and radio engagements. Partly as a result of the group’s hectic schedule, only eight of the tracks are original compositions, with cover versions of songs by artists such as Carl Perkins, Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly and Little Richard being used to complete the album. The sessions also produced a non-album single, “I Feel Fine” backed by “She’s a Woman”.

Beatles for Sale held the number 1 spot for 11 of the 46 weeks that it spent in the UK top 20. It was similarly successful in Australia, where the band’s cover of Berry’s “Rock and Roll Music” also topped the singles chart. One of the songs omitted from the US version of the album, “Eight Days a Week”, became the Beatles’ seventh number 1 in the US when issued as a single there in February 1965. Beatles for Sale was not released in the US until 1987, when the Beatles’ catalogue was standardised for release on CD.

The Beatles – A hard day’s night (The ’59) #037

The ’59 2018 #037: 180206

The Beatles – A hard days night (1964)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 6 – 1964.

A Hard Day’s Night was the third studio album from the Beatles, released on 10 July 1964, with side one containing songs from the soundtrack to their film A Hard Day’s Night.

The American version of the album was released two weeks earlier, on 26 June 1964 by United Artists Records, with a different track listing. In contrast to their first two albums, all 13 tracks on A Hard Day’s Night were written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney showcasing the development of their songwriting talents. The title track, with its distinct opening chord,[and the previously released “Can’t Buy Me Love”, were both transatlantic number-one singles for the band.

The album’s title was the accidental creation of drummer Ringo Starr. According to Lennon in a 1980 interview with Playboy magazine:

I was going home in the car and Dick Lester [director of the movie] suggested the title, ‘Hard Day’s Night’ from something Ringo had said. I had used it in In His Own Write, but it was an off-the-cuff remark by Ringo. You know, one of those malapropisms. A Ringo-ism, where he said it not to be funny … just said it. So Dick Lester said, ‘We are going to use that title.

Gerry & the Pacemakers – How do you like it? (“The ’59”) #035

The ’59 2018 #035: 180204

Gerry & The Pacemakers – How do you like it? (1963)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 5 – 1963.

Gerry and the Pacemakers were prominent in the 1960s Merseybeat scene. In common with the Beatles, they came from Liverpool, were managed by Brian Epstein, and were recorded by George Martin.

They are most remembered for being the first act to reach number one in the UK Singles Chart with their first three single releases: “How Do You Do It?”, “I Like It” and “You’ll Never Walk Alone”. This record was not equalled for 20 years, until the mid-1980s success of fellow Liverpool band Frankie Goes to Hollywood.

How do you like it” was their debut album, released in October 1963. It reached No.2 in the albums charts.