John Martyn – Solid Air (Epic 2017 #168)

The Epic 2017 Project #168: 170617

John Martyn – Solid Air (1973)

Solid Air was the fourth studio album from the late folk singer-songwriter John Martyn, released in February 1973 by Island Records.

The album was recorded over eight days and features instrumental contributions by bassist Danny Thompson and members of Fairport Convention.”Solid Air”, the title track, was dedicated to a friend of Martyn’s, Nick Drake, who would die of an antidepressant overdose 18 months after the album was released. Martyn said of the track

“It was done for a friend of mine, and it was done right with very clear motives, and I’m very pleased with it, for varying reasons. It has got a very simple message, but you’ll have to work that one out for yourself.”

The album features an avant-garde cover of Skip James’ “Devil Got My Woman,”here retitled “I’d Rather Be the Devil” and performed with heavy use of Martyn’s Echoplex tape delay effect.

“May You Never” became something of a signature song for Martyn, becoming a staple of his live performances. Released in November 1971 as a single in an early form, the song was re-recorded during the Solid Air sessions. Eric Clapton covered “May You Never” on his 1977 album Slowhand. When Martyn was presented with a lifetime achievement award by Phil Collins (a collaborator of Martyn’s) at the 2008 BBC Folk Awards, Clapton sent a message saying that he was “so far ahead of everything else it was inconceivable” and acknowledged the extent of his influence on “everyone who ever heard him.”Martyn and his band, including John Paul Jones on mandolin, played “May You Never” and “Over The Hill” at the Awards Ceremony.

A remastered CD was issued by Universal Records in October 2000. This CD was packaged in a card slipcase, and featured a remastered version of the original album with the addition of a live version of “I’d Rather Be The Devil”. Solid Air was given a further remastering and repackaging when a double CD reissue curated by John Hillarby was released in 2009, and which included several alternate studio and live versions.

The album cover is an example of schlieren photography demonstrating the ‘solid’ nature of air.

Arlo Guthrie – Alice’s Restaurant (Epic #102)

The Epic 2017 Project #102: 170412

Arlo Guthrie – Alice’s Restaurant (1967)

Arlo Guthrie’s debut album is essentially all about the song ‘Alice’s Restaurant Massacre’ which dominates the whole of side 2.

“Alice’s Restaurant Massacree” is a satirical, first-person account of 1960s counterculture. It was also the inspiration for the 1969 film of the same name.

The song is Guthrie’s most prominent work, based on a true incident from his life that began on Thanksgiving Day 1965 with a citation for littering, and ended with the refusal of the U.S. Army to draft him because of his conviction for that crime. The ironic punch line of the story which is (of course) an open invitation to listeners to join together to resist the draft for the Vietnam war, goes like this …

I’m sittin’ here on the Group W bench ’cause you want to know if I’m moral enough to join the Army — burn women, kids, houses and villages — after bein’ a litterbug.

 

Fanfarlo – Reservoir (Epic 2017 #080)

The Epic 2017 Project #080: 170321

Fanfarlo -Reservoir (2008)

Fanfarlo’s debut album was recorded in October and November 2008 at Tarquin Studios in Bridgeport, Connecticut, United States and was produced by Peter Katis. It includes the band’s featured singles “Fire Escape” and “Harold T. Wilkins, or How to Wait for a Very Long Time”, which were released on preceding EPs. Three further singles, “Drowning Men”, “The Walls Are Coming Down” and “I’m a Pilot” were released from the album in the summer of 2009.

Leonard Cohen – Songs (Epic 2017 #039)

The Epic 2017 Project #039: 170208

Leonard Cohen – Songs (1967)

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This was Leonard Cohen’s debut album. Prior to its recording he’d received critical acclaim as a poet and novelist but had maintained a keen interest in music, having played guitar in a country and western band called the Buckskin Boys as a teenager. In 1966 he set out for Nashville, where he hoped to become a country songwriter, but instead got caught up in New York City’s folk scene. Then, later that year Judy Collins recorded “Suzanne” for her album In My Life and Cohen soon came to the attention of famed record producer John Hammond who signed him to his contract with Columbia Records. The rest, as they say, is history.

The album features some of Cohen’s most celebrated songs. Mojo magazine described it as ‘…not only the cornerstone of Cohen’s remarkable career, but also a genuine songwriting landmark in terms of language, thematic developments and even arrangements‘. “Suzanne” (featured here) was ranked 41st on Pitchfork Media’s ‘Top 200 Songs of the 1960s’.

Leonard Cohen passed away on 7 November last year, aged 82.

The Civil Wars – Barton Hollow (Epic 2017 #037)

The Epic 2017 Project #037: 170206

The Civil Wars – Barton Hollow (2012)

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Bit of a sore point – this album. In November 2012, we had tickets to see them for the Brighton leg of the ‘Barton Hollow’ tour. But, due to what was loosely dubbed ‘personal reasons’ at the time, they cancelled all remaining UK dates after a sell-out gig at London’s Roundhouse on 6th November. We found out the real reason soon enough as, just over a week later the duo of Joy Williams and John Paul White announced a permanent parting of ways due to unreconcilable differences. Seemed they had lived up to their name in more ways than one!