The Animals (The ’59) #042

The ’59’ 2018 #042: 180211

The Animals (1964)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 6 – 1964.

The Animals (Eric Burton – vox, Alan Price – keys, Chas Chandler – bass, Hilton Valentine – guitar and John Steel – drums) formed in Newcastle-upon-Tyne in the early 1960s but moved to London upon finding fame in 1964. Their 1964 self-titled debut promulgates their gritty, bluesy sound and features their signature song and transatlantic No. 1 hit single, “House of the Rising Sun”, as well as hits such as “We Gotta Get Out of This Place”, “It’s My Life”, “I’m Crying” and “Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood”. The band balanced tough, rock-edged pop singles against rhythm and blues-orientated album material and were known in the US as part of the British Invasion.

The original lineup reunited for a one off benefit concert in their home city of Newcastle in 1968 and later had brief comebacks in 1975 and 1983. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1994.

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The Kinks (The ’59) #041

The ’59 2018 #041: 180210

The Kinks (1964)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 6 – 1964.

The self-titled debut album from The Kinks was released in 1964. A slimmed down version (with three tracks omitted) was as ‘You Really Got Me’ in the US.

The album was re-released in 1998 in the UK on Castle Records with twelve bonus tracks. This reissue was itself reissued in 2004 on the Sanctuary label and a deluxe edition was released on 28 March 2011.

The Rolling Stones – 12 x 5 (The ’59) #040

The ’59 2018 #040: 180209

The Rolling Stones – 12 x 5 (1964)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 6 – 1964.

2 X 5 is the second American album by The Rolling Stones, released in 1964 following the massive success of their debut The Rolling Stones in the UK and the promising sales of its American substitute, The Rolling Stones (England’s Newest Hit Makers)

In August 2002, 12 X 5 was reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records. This edition includes stereo versions of “Around and Around”, “Confessin’ the Blues”, “Empty Heart”, “It’s All Over Now”, an extended version of “2120 South Michigan Avenue”, and “If You Need Me”.

The Beatles – A hard day’s night (The ’59) #037

The ’59 2018 #037: 180206

The Beatles – A hard days night (1964)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 6 – 1964.

A Hard Day’s Night was the third studio album from the Beatles, released on 10 July 1964, with side one containing songs from the soundtrack to their film A Hard Day’s Night.

The American version of the album was released two weeks earlier, on 26 June 1964 by United Artists Records, with a different track listing. In contrast to their first two albums, all 13 tracks on A Hard Day’s Night were written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney showcasing the development of their songwriting talents. The title track, with its distinct opening chord,[and the previously released “Can’t Buy Me Love”, were both transatlantic number-one singles for the band.

The album’s title was the accidental creation of drummer Ringo Starr. According to Lennon in a 1980 interview with Playboy magazine:

I was going home in the car and Dick Lester [director of the movie] suggested the title, ‘Hard Day’s Night’ from something Ringo had said. I had used it in In His Own Write, but it was an off-the-cuff remark by Ringo. You know, one of those malapropisms. A Ringo-ism, where he said it not to be funny … just said it. So Dick Lester said, ‘We are going to use that title.

The Beatles – with the Beatles (“The ’59”) #033

“The ’59” 2018 #033: 180202

The Beatles – with the Beatles (1963)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes will turn 59 having been born in 1959. So ‘The ’59’ is working through the top album releases every year from 1959 through 2018. We’ve just reached 1963.

The Beatles’ second album was released on 22 November 1963, on Parlophone, and was recorded four months after the band’s debut Please Please Me. It features eight original compositions (seven by Lennon–McCartney and “Don’t Bother Me”, George Harrison’s first recorded solo composition and his first released on a Beatles album) and six covers (mostly of Motown, rock and roll, and R&B hits). The cover photograph was taken by the fashion photographer Robert Freeman, and it has been mimicked by several music groups over the years.

The album became the first Beatles album released in North America when it was released in Canada on 25 November under the augmented title Beatlemania! With the Beatles, with additional text on the album cover, and issued only in mono at the time, catalogue number T 6051 (a stereo Canadian release would come in 1968, catalogue number ST 6051).

The Beatles – Please please me (“The ’59”) #032

“The ’59” 2018 #032: 180201

The Beatles – Please please me (1963)

The debut studio album from The Beatles, rush-released by Parlophone on 22 March 1963 in the UK to capitalise on the success of their singles “Please Please Me” and “Love Me Do”.

Of the album’s 14 songs, eight were written by Lennon–McCartney, early evidence of what Rolling Stone later called “[their invention of] the idea of the self-contained rock band, writing their own hits and playing their own instruments.”

In 2012, the album was voted 39th on Rolling Stone magazine’s list of the “500 Greatest Albums of All Time”

The Rolling Stones – Aftermath (Epic #268)

The Epic 2017 Project #268: 170925

The Rolling Stones – Aftermath (1966)

Aftermath, released in April 1966 by Decca Records, is the fourth British studio album by the Rolling Stones. It was later issued in the United States in June 1966 by London Records as the group’s sixth American album. The album is considered an artistic breakthrough for the band: it is the first to consist entirely of Mick Jagger–Keith Richards compositions, while Brian Jones played a variety of instruments not usually associated with their music, including sitar, Appalachian dulcimer, marimbas and Japanese koto, as well as guitar, harmonica and keyboards, though much of the music is still rooted in Chicago electric blues. It was the first Rolling Stones album to be recorded entirely in the US, at the RCA Studios in California, and their first album released in true stereo. It is also one of the earliest rock albums to eclipse the 50-minute mark, and contains one of the earliest rock songs to eclipse the 10-minute mark (“Goin’ Home”).

In August 2002 both editions of Aftermath were reissued in a new remastered CD and SACD digipak by ABKCO Records, with the UK version containing an otherwise unavailable stereo mix of “Mother’s Little Helper”. In the same year the US edition of Aftermath was ranked No. 109 on the List of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time. The album was included in Robert Dimery’s 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die.