Walter Trout – Transition (Epic #333)

The Epic 2017 Project #333: 171129

Walter Trout – Transition (1992)

Walter Trout’s third studio album from 1992.

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George Thorogood & The Destroyers (Epic #328)

The Epic 2017 Project #328: 171124

George Thorogood & The Destroyers (1977)

George Thorogood’s self-titled debut was released in 1977. Comprising mostly covers of blues classics, it included a medley of John Lee Hooker’s “House Rent Boogie” and “One Bourbon, One Scotch, One Beer”, the latter a song written by Rudy Toombs for Amos Milburn, and later covered by Hooker.

In 2015 Rounder released George Thorogood and the Delaware Destroyers, a new remix of the album featuring the three-piece band as originally recorded and mixed. It omits the bass overdubs by Billy Blough which were added after the original recording sessions. It also adds the previously unreleased Elmore James track “Goodbye Baby.

The Temperance Movement (Epic #324)

The Epic 2017 Project #324: 171120

The Temperance Movement (2013)

The Temperance Movement are a blues rock band formed in 2011 by Glasgow-born vocalist Phil Campbell and guitarists Luke Potashnick and Paul Sayer. The rhythm section consists of bassist Nick Fyffe and the Australian-born drummer Damon Wilson.The band released their Pride EP in 2012, and their eponymous debut studio album was released on 16 September 2013. Collectively the band have a rich history of experience, having previously played with Rooster, Ben’s Brother, Jamiroquai, Ray Davies, The Waterboys and Feeder.

The band’s self-titled debut album featured the five tracks from the Pride EP (released in 2012) alongside seven new songs, with an extra two songs included with purchases from the iTunes store (“Mother’s Eyes” and “Already Know”). Here though is ‘Ain’t no telling’.

Joanne Shaw Taylor – Songs from the road (Epic #321)

The Epic 2017 Project #321: 171117

Joanne Shaw Taylor – Songs from the road (2013)

Songs from the Road is a live album covering Joanne Shaw Taylor’s first three studio albums. Released on 12 May 2013 on Ruf Records, the album included a DVD recorded live at London’s Borderline club.

‘Watch ’em burn’ is, (in my opinion) Ms Taylor’s signature piece. Eleven minutes of blistering R&B and stunning fretwork which she gave us for an encore when we saw her at Shoreham’s Ropetackle Centre a couple of years back.

Ten Years After – Recorded Live (Epic #313)

The Epic 2017 Project #313: 171109

Ten Years After – Recorded Live (1973)

Concluding the Jemtunes mini series about Ten Years After, here’s ‘Recorded Live’ from 1973. Epic 2017 features not quite every Ten Years After album – but certainly the eight in my book that really count.

Recorded Live was the band’s third live album. Containing no overdubs or additives, the album was recorded over four nights in Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Frankfurt and Paris with the Rolling Stones’ mobile recording truck and later mixed from sixteen tracks to stereo at Olympic Studios in London.

Here’s the ubiquitous ‘I’m going home’, Ten Years After’s anthem track. This is the ‘Woodstock’ version

Ten Years After – Rock n Roll Music to the World (Epic #312)

The Epic 2017 Project #312: 171108

Ten Years After – Rock n roll music to the world (1972)

Continuing the Jemtunes mini series about Ten Years After, here’s Rock n Roll music to the world from 1972. Epic 2017 features not quite every Ten Years After album – but certainly the eight in my book that really count.

This was TYA’s seventh studio album.

Ten Years After – A space in time (Epic #311)

The Epic 2017 Project #311: 171107

Ten Years After – A space in time (1971)

Continuing the Jemtunes mini series about Ten Years After, here’s A space in Time from 1971. Epic 2017 features not quite every Ten Years After album – but certainly the eight in my book that really count.

A Space in Time, the sixth studio album saw a departure from Deram, this one being released by Chrysalis Records in the United Kingdom and Columbia Records in America. A departure also in style from their previous albums, A Space in Time is less ‘heavy’ than previous albums and includes more acoustic guitar, perhaps influenced by the success of Led Zeppelin who were mixing acoustic songs with heavier numbers.

“Baby Won’t You Let Me Rock ‘n’ Roll You” charted as a single in the USA, peaking at No. 61.