Leonard Cohen – Suzanne (Starters for Ten #263) 3.10.27

Starters for Ten 2019 – #263: Top Ten 1960’s numbers: 190920

Leonard Cohen – Suzanne (1967)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Continuing my 27th top ten – running between 18 and 27 September and featuring my top ten 1960’s numbers – here’s Suzanne from Leonard Cohen’s debut album, released in November 1967.

Katy Melua – The closest thing to crazy (Starters for ten #202) 2.10.21

Starters for Ten 2019 – #202: Top Ten Sunday morning tracks: 190721

Katy Melua – The closest thing to crazy (2003)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Continuing the 21st – running between 20 and 29 July and featuring my top ten Sunday morning tracks – here’s The closest thing to crazy from Kay Melua’s 2003 album ‘Call off the search’

Jimi Hendrix – The wind cries Mary (Starters for ten #189) 9.10.19

Starters for Ten 2019 – #189: Top Ten Jimi Hendrix numbers: 190708

The wind cries Mary (1967)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

For the penultimate of the 19th, running between 30 June and 9 July and featuring my top ten Jimi Hendrix numbers – here’s The wind cries Mary, released in 1967.

Hendrix producer Chaz Chandler (of ‘The Animals’ fame) said this about it…

That was recorded at the tail end of the session for “Fire”. We had about twenty minutes or so left. I suggested we cut a demo of “The Wind Cries Mary”. Mitch Mitchell [drummer] and Noel Redding [bassist] hadn’t heard it, so they were going about it without a rehearsal. They played it once through [and Hendrix then suggested overdubs]. In all he put on four or five more overdubs, but the whole things was done in twenty minutes. That was our third single.

Bill Withers – Aint no sunshine (Starters for Ten #160) 10/10 (16)

Starters for Ten 2019 – #160: Top Ten Lurve songs: 190609

Bill Withers – Ain’t no sunshine (1971)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Concluding the 16th – featuring my top ten ‘lurve’ songs – here’s Ain’t no sunshine released by Bill Withers in 1971.

The 2019 ‘Starters for Ten’ series features:
[1] Jan 1-10: Top Ten Blues Rock Stonkers
[2] Jan 10-20: Top Ten Led Zeppelin Tracks
[3] Jan 21-30: Top Ten Spinetinglers
[4] Jan 31-Feb 9: Top Ten Underworld Tracks
[5] Feb 10-19: Top Ten Acoustic Tracks
[6] Feb 20-Mar 1: Top Ten Queen Tracks
[7] Mar 2-11: Top Ten Live Tracks
[8] Mar 12-21: Top Ten Classical pieces
[9] Mar 22-31: Top Ten Soul tracks
[10] April 1-10: Top Ten Classic Rock tracks
[11] April 11-20: Top Ten ‘Ten Years After’ numbers
[12] April 12-30: Top Ten ‘Talking Heads’ tracks
[13] May 1-10: Top Ten Punk Anthems
[14] May 11-20: Top Ten Rock numbers
[15] May 21-30: Top Ten Boogie tracks
[16] May 31-June 9: Top Ten Lurve songs
[17] June 10-19: Top Ten Driving Tracks

Nat King Cole – When I fall in Love (Starters for Ten #159) 9/10 (16)

Starters for Ten 2019 – #159: Top Ten Lurve songs: 190608

Nat King Cole – When I fall in love (1956)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

And for the penultimate number of the 16th – featuring my top ten ‘lurve’ songs, and running between 31 May and 9 June – here’s Nat King Cole’s When I fall in love, released in 1956.

The Carpenters – Goodbye to Love (Starters for Ten #151) 1/10 (16)

Starters for Ten 2019 – #151: Top Ten Lurve songs: 190531

The Carpenters – Goodbye to Love (1972)

Throughout 2019 Jem of Jemtunes is taking you through 36 top tens and one top five. Tunes for a whole gamut of reasons including genre, mood, time of year or simply time itself. Sometimes there’s be words but mostly it’ll simply be the music. Because music always speaks for itself.

Kickstarting the 16th – featuring my top ten ‘lurve’ songs, and running between 31 May and 9 June – here’s Goodbye to Love composed by Richard Carpenter and John Bettis and released by the Carpenters in 1972.

On the ‘Close to You: Remembering The Carpenters’ documentary, Tony Peluso stated that this was one of the first power ballads, if not the first, to have a fuzz guitar solo. In my opinion, it’s also one of the best guitar solos ever!

The Rolling Stones – Goats Head Soup (The ’59) #091

The ’59 2018 #091: 180401

The Rolling Stones – Goats Head Soup (1973)

This year, Jem of Jemtunes, born in 1959, turns 59. So ‘The ’59’ celebrates 59 years of cracking tunes with a few albums from each year – 1959 through 2018. We’re currently at year 15 – 1973.

The Stones’ third number one album in a row, on both sides of the Atlantic, was released in August 1973.

It included another classic Stones ballad, “Angie”. Inspired by Keith’s newborn daughter Angela, it was released as a single and became their seventh No.1 record in America. Strangely, it only made number five in Britain, but it did make the top spot in France and Holland, as well as number two in Germany.

The most controversial track on the album was, without a doubt, “Star Star”, which caused Atlantic Records boss, Ahmet Ertegan, whose company distributed the album for Rolling Stones Records, to initially be concerned about the strong lyrics. Later he realized that the BBC and other radio stations across the world banning the song just added to the publicity for the album.

The early work on the album was done at Dynamic Sound in Jamaica with later sessions at Village Recorders in Los Angeles, Olympic and Island studios in London. Among the other musicians on the record are Bobby Keys and Jim Horn on saxes, Nicky Hopkins and Ian Stewart on piano and Billy Preston on clavinet.